Monday, May 30, 2011

New for Spring II: Fused Glass Window Pendants

I typically try to make new glass designs about twice a year, once before I begin my show schedule in Spring and the second before the holidays. Here's what I am calling "window" pendants because the solid glass creates a frame of the window that allows you to see the glass design. I have two styles, one where you see a glimpse and the other that reminds me of an open window with a roman shade.


To make these, I first make the patterned glass. This can be made from glass threads, chards, frit and bits.


After it's fused together, I cut it up with my tile saw and grind the edges to smooth them out so that they will fuse nicely in the next step.


And, I add the solid colored glass as the frame. This goes back into the kiln to be fused together.


Once again, I use my tile saw to cut the glass, this time into pendants. Next I grind the edges to make each pendant even. And then, these pendants go back into the kiln to be "fire polished."


Fire polishing gives the pendants a nice sheen as seen in the first photo above. This is my second batch of pendants. Here's a photo of the first batch just before going into the kiln to be fire polished.


I'm happy with how they turned out. In fact, the second batch is to restock some colors after my first show as well as expand into a few new designs. Let me know what you think.

17 comments:

  1. They are beautiful. What do you typically sell them for?

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  2. Hi Lynn. When you add the solid on the sides, is it 2 layers of 3mm, or did you prefuse 2 layers of 3mm and then cut that up for the sides?

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  3. I use 2 layers of 3mm but you could also prefuse the 2 layers and cut that up for the sides as long as the edge is square and not rounded.

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  4. Thanks Lyn.
    I am having a little trouble with the correct volume of glass so just trying to understand how you layered things up.
    So the feature panels are initially fused onto 3mm and then cut up.
    When you fuse this with the sides I assume you put the feature strips on clear and have say 2 layers of 3mm black for the borders.
    Is that correct, and do you have to make the sides meet perfectly to get a good fuse?

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  5. Normally the center is on 3 mm. So, I would put the center on a layer of 3mm clear, which is the width of the bar and then add on the colored portion. However, I've also done these where the center is thicker, 1/4" or larger as I might use a melt cut up (see 6th row, pendant #5) of last photo. In that one, I would not put it on a layer of clear and just add the 2 3mm layers for the sides.

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  6. Well, I made a few feature panels and am waiting for them to cool down now. Looks like the edges pulled in a bit, as expected for 3mm, but should be okay.
    Thanks so much for your help.

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  7. Happy to help. Hopefully yours turned out okay. I hope I was clear in the my reply. The entire pendant is 6mm or 1/4" of glass (plus the center decoration - frit, stringer...etc).

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  8. Hi Lynn, My name is Juls, I happen to stumble onto your Blog I love it..thank you so much for all the pics and tips you are truly a very nice person...can you E-mail me please your Fire Polish schedule I am new at this and would so much appreciate any help...I really want to make the rain drops you make to add to some of my fuse ideas...thanks again..let's keep in touch...

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  9. Hi Lynn, Juls here again, you know a while back when I was experimenting I did the opposite of what you did. I used clear as a base but color,color stripe,color piece of glass then fused it all together. Couple of days later when I picked it cracked down the middle of the glass I suppose it had to do with the clear base ...this time trying it your way..

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  10. Hi Julie. The fire polish schedule is pretty much the same as the full fuse but the process temperature is lower. I tend to take these to 1385 but it may vary with your kiln. You'll probably want to take notes and try out different temperatures to get the look you want. In terms of whether clear is the base or not, you shouldn't get cracking, especially on a piece that is so small. My guess is that perhaps the glass is not compatible. If you e-mail me your schedule, I'll look at it.

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  11. Hi Lynn, it's ok, you know that's how we all learn is by experimenting...LOL..actually I think what I probably did was put some box on top of my piece then it cracked ...LOL..oops but I still kept it for refrence..thanks again for taking the time to keep up your blog..I want to do your flower petal votives can you send me the pattern, I so tried to draw a petal out but believe me when I tell you I failed in Drawing..LOL..tootles

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    1. Hi Julie. Here's a tip to help you make the petals. Fold a piece of paper in half and draw one side of the petal before you cut it out. It will then be symmetrical. And, if you're not happy with it, use the same process but adjust your drawing to make it wider or narrower to suit your taste.

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  12. Please let me know what glue you use to attach the bails. Mine sometimes part. I am a South African glass artist and run a teaching studio called Glass Escapes. Www.glassescapes.com

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  13. Please let me know what glue you use to attach the bails. Mine sometimes part. I am a South African glass artist and run a teaching studio called Glass Escapes. Www.glassescapes.com

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    1. I use E6000 and don't touch it for 24 hours. If the consistency is globby (rather than stringy), I discard that portion of the glue.

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